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Author Topic: No pictures, but ... a cheap way to get high heat without burning pizza bottom  (Read 2647 times)

addicted-to-smoke

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I'd settled on my Stok pizza stone for awhile. For those not familiar with it, it allows you to not have to use a cook grate, is thicker than most, and is a large diameter that helps block heat from the bottom of the pie. For a simple setup, it's reliably OK.

Couldn't find it yesterday; might be in storage. And all of my thin pizza stones I never liked are gone. So I placed my Brinkmann water pan upside down on a sacrificial cook grate, with a largish round aluminum pizza pan supporting the pizza. https://www.amazon.com/Brinkmann-812-0002-0-Smoker-Charcoal-15-Inch/dp/B0049EYYCS <<-- still available.

Fuel was 1 full chimney + a small log from an apple tree. The fruitwood makes the heat and extends the heat time a little ... the upside down water pan shields the bottom of the pizza against heat ... so does the largish metal pizza pan.

I only used one charcoal holder, off to one side, because I wanted the rest of the charcoal to be more dispersed, not concentrated under the pie. The burning fruitwood log consumed most of the charcoal holder, with similarly lit briquets poured on top and spilled over around the charcoal holder. I took pains to remove briquets from touching the bowl of course.

Rotating the aluminum pizza tray after a few minutes, I was able to do 3 frozen pizzas one right after another, quickly and all with great results! It was the first time I was able to get sustained high heat. My red turned dark maroon all over. And yes the lid still fit. Best crust evah!
It's the iconic symbol for the backyard. It's family/friends, food and fun. What more do you need to feel everything [is] going to be all right. As long as we can still have a BBQ in our backyard, the world seems a bit of a better place. At least for that moment. -reillyranch

Bob BQ

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@addicted-to-smoke Dave, the Stok pizza stone that you're referring to... is that the big ol' 21+" Mega Pizza Stone?
« Last Edit: March 29, 2018, 03:28:36 AM by Bob BQ »
BBQ:it's what's for dinner. Grail: 18 Custom - "The Californian"

addicted-to-smoke

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Yes, Bob

https://www.amazon.com/SIS7000-Grills-Pizza-Grilling-Stone/dp/B00COA77B4

I still like it, but what I used the other day (raising pizza height + more heat via the small log) cooks a better pizza, faster, cheaper too.
It's the iconic symbol for the backyard. It's family/friends, food and fun. What more do you need to feel everything [is] going to be all right. As long as we can still have a BBQ in our backyard, the world seems a bit of a better place. At least for that moment. -reillyranch

Bob BQ

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  • Posts: 4622
Thank you. Good to know. I've been wondering how the Stok mega stone performs.
BBQ:it's what's for dinner. Grail: 18 Custom - "The Californian"

addicted-to-smoke

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  • Posts: 5783
Thank you. Good to know. I've been wondering how the Stok mega stone performs.

It's thicker than either the typical Pampered Chef or the Weber stone. They are about 1/4" and the Mega Stok is about 1/2" and the difference is that it's harder to burn the bottom of the crust with the Stok.

If Stok had made the stone a little smaller diameter, and made the supporting metal frame raised up, maybe with an offset it would be a more successful design. For that matter, they could have just used their existing (and smaller) stone for their insert system with an offset frame to position the pie closer to one edge of the kettle, away from heat.

Somebody out there has to realize that those of us without KettlePizza's often raise the pie in order to help cook the toppings and avoid burning the bottom.
It's the iconic symbol for the backyard. It's family/friends, food and fun. What more do you need to feel everything [is] going to be all right. As long as we can still have a BBQ in our backyard, the world seems a bit of a better place. At least for that moment. -reillyranch

blksabbath

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  • Posts: 797
Somebody out there has to realize that those of us without KettlePizza's often raise the pie in order to help cook the toppings and avoid burning the bottom.

Or raise the fire up almost to the level of the pizza, which is what I did when using the small stok insert.  I wish the Stok grate had hinged or open sides.

addicted-to-smoke

  • WKC Ambassador
  • Posts: 5783
Somebody out there has to realize that those of us without KettlePizza's often raise the pie in order to help cook the toppings and avoid burning the bottom.

Or raise the fire up almost to the level of the pizza, which is what I did when using the small stok insert.  I wish the Stok grate had hinged or open sides.

Ooh, I never thought of this! If I understand correctly, I could for example use two charcoal baskets, one left empty and turned upside down. Place the other charcoal basket on top of that, fill as before. Open flip grate.

The heat would be "at level" (or higher?) with the cook grate and therefore, "rolling up/over" the top of the pizza, yeah?
It's the iconic symbol for the backyard. It's family/friends, food and fun. What more do you need to feel everything [is] going to be all right. As long as we can still have a BBQ in our backyard, the world seems a bit of a better place. At least for that moment. -reillyranch

blksabbath

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  • Posts: 797
Yep.  I would make a V with two baskets on one end, then add one stacked to get it up to the grate level.  It worked great.  Again, this was with the little insert.  I didn't even know the monster grate existed.