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Author Topic: Slow N Sear VS Banked Charcoal  (Read 1790 times)

Troy

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Slow N Sear VS Banked Charcoal
« on: July 01, 2017, 10:08:53 AM »
I'm a big fan of the SNS because it makes cooking easier AND prolongs the beauty of my precious vintage kettles :)

I was hoping the brats whould show how much more even the indirect cook zone is with the SNS, but they ended up looking the same.
The temp differences on the exterior porcelain were VERY different.


The Original Slow N Sear Review mentioned this but didn't go into any detail.

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mhiszem

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Re: Slow N Sear VS Banked Charcoal
« Reply #1 on: July 01, 2017, 10:14:58 AM »
Thanks for the video. That is a crazy difference in temp on the exterior of the kettle. It shows how much better the SNS is better at concentrating the heat in one area.


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kettlebb

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Re: Slow N Sear VS Banked Charcoal
« Reply #2 on: July 01, 2017, 10:32:59 AM »
That was great Troy. I also make sure to leave a small gap between the bowl and the SnS just to make it even cooler. Love my SnS and with my new job I'll probably get another in a month or two. Thanks again Troy.


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HoosierKettle

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Slow N Sear VS Banked Charcoal
« Reply #3 on: July 01, 2017, 10:56:49 AM »
I'm glad this came up.  My question is off topic as it pertains to the sns but on topic as far as cooking sausages.

For years I've cooked johsonville brats and sausages cooked direct with coals spread out, turning, rotating, covering and adjusting vents as needed. My casings always split but the results were still very juicy and casings had bite but were tender.

Now, I've been using the indirect method and sear at the end just like your video. Every time I use the indirect method, the casings turn out very tough. Inside is juicy and good but the outside sucks. I see this method used all of the time. What the hell could I be doing wrong??

I always mix up the sausages too lol. I warn my wife ahead of time that it will be impossible to keep them sorted so I keep a low expectation.


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« Last Edit: July 01, 2017, 11:17:14 AM by HoosierKettle »

kettlebb

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Re: Slow N Sear VS Banked Charcoal
« Reply #4 on: July 01, 2017, 11:28:40 AM »
Same here @HoosierKettle. I just started cooking them on the grill this year. I used to get a sauce pan and pour in 3 beers and cook them in the. Beer. Once they reached 160 I'd take them to the grill for the finish look and char. Now doing them on the grill I have the same results you do. Only thing I can think of is our temp is too high.


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Troy

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  • Posts: 9160
Re: Slow N Sear VS Banked Charcoal
« Reply #5 on: July 01, 2017, 11:33:01 AM »
I'm glad this came up.  My question is off topic as it pertains to the sns but on topic as far as cooking sausages.

For years I've cooked johsonville brats and sausages cooked direct with coals spread out, turning, rotating, covering and adjusting vents as needed. My casings always split but the results were still very juicy and casings had bite but were tender.

Now, I've been using the indirect method and sear at the end just like your video. Every time I use the indirect method, the casings turn out very tough. Inside is juicy and good but the outside sucks. I see this method used all of the time. What the hell could I be doing wrong??

I always mix up the sausages too lol. I warn my wife ahead of time that it will be impossible to keep them sorted so I keep a low expectation.

I've experienced this as well.
I always try to move the brats to the direct side when they're at maximum size/pressure. (right before they start popping)
I go by color and feel when finishing direct, making sure the casings are toasted enough to be bite through.



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HoosierKettle

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Slow N Sear VS Banked Charcoal
« Reply #6 on: July 17, 2017, 05:41:00 PM »
Same here @HoosierKettle. I just started cooking them on the grill this year. I used to get a sauce pan and pour in 3 beers and cook them in the. Beer. Once they reached 160 I'd take them to the grill for the finish look and char. Now doing them on the grill I have the same results you do. Only thing I can think of is our temp is too high.


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I made brats tonight and I simmered them in a cast iron skillet on the grill with one can of beer.  Once they were tight I moved them to direct heat for color then back to the skillet to serve and keep warm. Perfect texture on the outside and juicy. I had always cooked direct all the way through previously and the casing would be tender but I would get one or two too done.  This method is fantastic. I never simmered before because I never liked anyone's simmered first brats but I think that's just because they simmered too long and cooked the shit out of them. 15 minutes is all I simmered for and they were great.

Thanks for reminding me of this method. Perfect results when executed properly.


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CarrieAnn

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Slow N Sear VS Banked Charcoal
« Reply #7 on: July 19, 2017, 03:45:02 AM »
...and if you take the time to caramelize some onions in a bit of butter, then add your beer to that and simmer your brats, then you have onion braised brats, which is a beautiful thing.

And if you're a hedonist and you use a lot of butter to caramelize your onions, and if you pop those brats in that delicious bath, and you think ahead enough to plan to have one or two extra, AND you add in a bit of extra beer and contain the leftovers in a tall narrow container, the butter/brat fat will rise to the top and harden in the fridge. Then the next morning you scoop off a bit of that fat and use it to make scrambled eggs with diced brats and beer brat braised onions and you take that shit to work with you and eat breakfast at your desk and your coworkers all comment at the cube farm "whoever is eating that delicious smelling stuff better have brought enough to share!"  Lol

Not that I would know, or anything...


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mhiszem

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Re: Slow N Sear VS Banked Charcoal
« Reply #8 on: July 19, 2017, 04:06:22 AM »
Wow that sounds amazing @CarrieAnn I may have to try that, since you haven't........
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CarrieAnn

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Slow N Sear VS Banked Charcoal
« Reply #9 on: July 19, 2017, 04:16:34 AM »
@mhiszem it's truly delicious.

I prefer to caramelize onions in a pan as I like the browning but sometimes life gets in the way. If you have a slow cooker that doesn't run too hot, you can caramelize them in that. Just cut a "crockpot full" of onions and pop them in there on low with about 6 tbsp of butter.

Now because I am an unrepentant flavor monger I put in about a stick and a half of butter and probably another few tbsp of olive oil. I set this up at night and let it cook overnight. If they are ready in the morning, I drain off most of the oil/butter in another container and pack up the onions.

Now you have a container of a lovely onion infused butter and it makes a MOST excellent finishing butter (just a little pat) on top of a seared steak. Or sautéed chicken in onion butter. Or spread on toast with the aforementioned scrambled eggs. There really isn't much it doesn't taste awesome with and your total effort was slicing onions and digging out the crockpot. :)


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mhiszem

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Re: Slow N Sear VS Banked Charcoal
« Reply #10 on: July 19, 2017, 04:29:45 AM »
Wow sounds amazing!
WGA, Uline Green SJ, '95 Red M/T, '88 Red 18", '01 Plum SSP, Patent Pending Yellow

HoosierKettle

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Re: Slow N Sear VS Banked Charcoal
« Reply #11 on: July 19, 2017, 05:51:09 AM »
Great tips @CarrieAnn!  That sounds incredible. I did onions and peppers inside this last time but I'll be sure and simmer the sausages in the beer onion butter bath next time.


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CarrieAnn

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Re: Slow N Sear VS Banked Charcoal
« Reply #12 on: July 19, 2017, 06:26:54 AM »
I apologize for hijacking this thread with this but I think these tips might be useful to the brat fans.  I just wanted to throw one last thing out there.

You realize you can freeze caramelized onions, right? 

So if you happen to make a metric ton of them and portion them into freezer bags or little containers and freeze them then you can thaw them along with your brats (if you are like me and try to buy them on sale or in bulk as opposed to buying and making immediately) and then warm those onions in a pan with your beer and make your brat bath.

If I am going to a friend's house to bbq, I will make the beer and onion brat bath and put it in a disposable aluminum pan and take my show on the road.  Then pop the whole thing on their grill (to rewarm and stand at the ready) and then sear them off when we are ready to eat.

This little trick also works nicely for a bbq where you are trying to prep ahead so you aren't trying to make everything at once.  Make those onions ahead and store them in a disposable aluminum pan, then when you are getting ready to cook, you can pop that pan on the grill, add beer and brats and get ready to sear.

And for my little smokey joe,  I use a disposable loaf pan for my beer onion bath.  It will hold several brats but because it is narrow rather than wide, it takes up less real estate on your grate.

Tips - I got'a million of 'em...