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Author Topic: Stuffed Skirts  (Read 5323 times)

Larry Wolfe

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Stuffed Skirts
« on: July 02, 2012, 04:19:36 AM »
I initially planned on making Cheese Steak Sliders, but could not find small buns and the baguette loaves were too small.  However, I went ahead as planned and stuffed 2 skirt steaks.
Started off slicing, onions, peppers and mushrooms.

Sauté the onion in EVOO and salt and pepper until they begin to sweat.


Then add the peppers, garlic and mushrooms.  Continue to sauté until tender, then cool before stuffing into the steaks.


Skirt steaks are always on sale around here, so I fill the freezer with them often.  They are a very flavorful, well marbled and somewhat fatty cut of meat.  They are wonderful for fajitas and require no trimming for direct quick grilling.  However, for this application I wanted to trim the fat from the inside of the skirt steaks to prevent the filling from getting greasy.  Leave the external fat. 


Pound out the steaks to ‘square up’ and make as uniform as possible, then overlap the two steaks by roughly an inch to create ‘one steak’.  I seasoned with Wolfe Rub Bold or your favorite seasoning, or simply salt and pepper.


Evenly spread the mixture leaving about an inch on the sides and a couple inches at the end to prevent ‘filling blowout’. 

Add 6 slices of provolone cheese, overlapping.


Carefully roll up the roast and tie with butcher’s twine.  Place in the fridge to firm up a bit.


I did not monitor cooking or meat temps.  I cooked indirect for one hour, with just lump, then finished with a quick sear.  I would suggest cooking in the 350º range and pulling at 125º if you want to monitor temperatures.
 

Let rest for 10 minutes or so and enjoy.

Larry Wolfe
----------------------------
The Wolfe Pit Blogspot

Duke

  • The Duke
  • Posts: 7970
Re: Stuffed Skirts
« Reply #1 on: July 02, 2012, 06:59:53 AM »
That looks really good Larry! Skirt steak never seems to be on sale around me. By the way, that pad of butter looks almost as big as the pile of rice. :P

Troy

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Re: Stuffed Skirts
« Reply #2 on: July 02, 2012, 08:22:05 AM »
i've never seen butter on rice before

the stuffed skirt (heh) looks fantastic!

SmoothSmoke

  • WKC Ranger
  • Posts: 522
Re: Stuffed Skirts
« Reply #3 on: July 02, 2012, 09:34:30 AM »
That looks very very tasty! 

Scotty Da Q

  • Smokey Joe
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Re: Stuffed Skirts
« Reply #4 on: July 02, 2012, 09:44:02 AM »
Mouthgasm !!!!
Regards,
Scotty Da Q

Duke

  • The Duke
  • Posts: 7970
Re: Stuffed Skirts
« Reply #5 on: July 02, 2012, 10:19:33 AM »
i've never seen butter on rice before


You are kidding right? ???

Larry Wolfe

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  • Posts: 442
    • The Wolfe Pit
Re: Stuffed Skirts
« Reply #6 on: July 02, 2012, 10:45:01 AM »
That a cute idea Larry. I couldn't help but notice that you said you "sauteed" the onion. Technically, you merely "sweated" the onion.
Let me elaborate:

When you are sautéing food you do it over medium to high heat and you want the food to brown and caramelize. By agitating the pan regularly you help the food to brown evenly. Generally this is done to help build a rich flavour profile which includes that lovely caramelized taste.

Sweating on the other hand, should not brown food. Instead the food is cooked over low to medium heat and should sizzle very gently so that the food (usually vegetables) can release it’s liquid and flavours into the pan without colouring. If you are making a soup for example sweating the main ingredients can help them to release their more subtle flavours into the soup before the liquid is added. A little trick, if you see your pan is too hot and food is starting to colour, add a tablespoon of cold water, it will cool down the pan quickly and evaporate.

This cannot be Kevin Kruger......the post on sweating vs. sauteeing is not 10 pages long AND I can pronounce every word on this post.  Had this really been Kevin, I would have fallen asleep.  However, I laughed my Allinghams off!
Larry Wolfe
----------------------------
The Wolfe Pit Blogspot

Troy

  • Statesman
  • Posts: 9363
Re: Stuffed Skirts
« Reply #7 on: July 02, 2012, 01:27:24 PM »
That a cute idea Larry. I couldn't help but notice that you said you "sauteed" the onion. Technically, you merely "sweated" the onion.
Let me elaborate:

When you are sautéing food you do it over medium to high heat and you want the food to brown and caramelize. By agitating the pan regularly you help the food to brown evenly. Generally this is done to help build a rich flavour profile which includes that lovely caramelized taste.

Sweating on the other hand, should not brown food. Instead the food is cooked over low to medium heat and should sizzle very gently so that the food (usually vegetables) can release it’s liquid and flavours into the pan without colouring. If you are making a soup for example sweating the main ingredients can help them to release their more subtle flavours into the soup before the liquid is added. A little trick, if you see your pan is too hot and food is starting to colour, add a tablespoon of cold water, it will cool down the pan quickly and evaporate.

Lets not go down the road of alt accounts and mud slinging.

Larry Wolfe

  • WKC Brave
  • Posts: 442
    • The Wolfe Pit
Re: Stuffed Skirts
« Reply #8 on: July 02, 2012, 01:41:09 PM »
That a cute idea Larry. I couldn't help but notice that you said you "sauteed" the onion. Technically, you merely "sweated" the onion.
Let me elaborate:

When you are sautéing food you do it over medium to high heat and you want the food to brown and caramelize. By agitating the pan regularly you help the food to brown evenly. Generally this is done to help build a rich flavour profile which includes that lovely caramelized taste.

Sweating on the other hand, should not brown food. Instead the food is cooked over low to medium heat and should sizzle very gently so that the food (usually vegetables) can release it’s liquid and flavours into the pan without colouring. If you are making a soup for example sweating the main ingredients can help them to release their more subtle flavours into the soup before the liquid is added. A little trick, if you see your pan is too hot and food is starting to colour, add a tablespoon of cold water, it will cool down the pan quickly and evaporate.

Lets not go down the road of alt accounts and mud slinging.

I agree, even though as funny as it is.......However, I swear this KK clone is not me, you have my word.
Larry Wolfe
----------------------------
The Wolfe Pit Blogspot

Troy

  • Statesman
  • Posts: 9363
Re: Stuffed Skirts
« Reply #9 on: July 02, 2012, 02:03:39 PM »
I know it's not you :)