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Author Topic: First reverse-sear steaks  (Read 313 times)

M635_Guy

  • Smokey Joe
  • Posts: 36
First reverse-sear steaks
« on: October 08, 2019, 04:55:19 PM »


Thoughts:
- Tried the cold-grate thing - seemed to work

- This finished a LOT faster than I thought it would, and was pretty easy overall.

- Did some briquettes for the indirect phase, then chimneyed some lump while I prepped the steaks to sear (pat dry, etc.)

- One steak finished more than the other (one was Med-rare, other was closer to medium). 

- Both were nicely juicy and tasty though - no complaints from the wife and spawn

kettlebb

  • WKC Ambassador
  • Posts: 5621
Re: First reverse-sear steaks
« Reply #1 on: October 08, 2019, 05:13:11 PM »
Awesome, do you have a picture of any slices?  What are your thoughts on reverse sear vs the other methods?


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HoosierKettle

  • WKC Ambassador
  • Posts: 5998
Re: First reverse-sear steaks
« Reply #2 on: October 08, 2019, 07:04:53 PM »
Perfect looking sear. Nice work.


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M635_Guy

  • Smokey Joe
  • Posts: 36
Re: First reverse-sear steaks
« Reply #3 on: October 09, 2019, 04:11:06 AM »
Awesome, do you have a picture of any slices?  What are your thoughts on reverse sear vs the other methods?

I didn't think about pix of slices before we'd all torn into it - I was starving before I even started cooking!   ;D

I actually thought reverse-sear was fantastic.  It's pretty clear that it optimizes for a moist piece of steak.  I've tried the Alton Brown method where you sear the heck of it the steak for 60 seconds on each side and then pop into a 500 oven for a couple minutes on each side.  That turns out really good also, but (A) it's hard to do for more than a couple steaks and (B) it makes an absolute freaking mess.  Of course, it also lacks the flavor added by the charcoal.

I'm 50, have made a ton of steaks over the years, tried a variety of things and those were easily as good as the best steaks I've ever made, and they were just basic thin(-ish) Angus rib-eyes  from Aldi.  It certainly makes me want to get some really good Prime steaks and have a go, which brings me to another thought.

I've never done the 2"-thick steak thing because I always felt like the thickness exponentially increased the chance of the steak winding up overcooked or under-cooked (I've never had a remote leave-in thermometer setup until I got my Weber last month).  Even as a guy who leans to the Rare side of Med-Rare, I didn't generally love the thick steaks coming off my grill.  Cooking indirect first makes that a relative non-issue, and the process I used where the steaks come off the grill to be patted-dry and seasoned with pepper before searing (as seen in a couple videos) makes me think the ability to finish to varying temps (Rare, med-rare, etc.) would be easier. 

FWIW, here's the process I used:
  • Started a half-chimney of (Weber) briquettes and dumped them in the Slow & Sear when hot (it was a little windy, so they were pretty hot).  I had the vents pretty tight so things didn't get too hot and let them "settle" a bit.
  • Temps seemed to stabilize pretty close to 300F, which seemed fine, so the steaks went on.  (I'd probably go low/slow for thicker steaks, and frankly I was planning to run lower than that here, but temp stability and hunger made the call in this case)
  • I flipped them when temps hit 90F or so.  At that point, I also started a little bit (a bit more than 1/3 chimney) of (Fogo black) lump.
  • I got a little busy in the house, and temps went to almost 120F before I got back outside and grabbed the steaks.
  • I patted them dry with a couple paper towels.  I was surprised how little was coming off them TBH, but this step apparently helps the sear since you don't have to boil off the water on the surface of the steak.  Makes sense I suppose, and this is where the opportunity lies to pull-early/leave-longer to a particular done-ness.
  • I removed the whole grate dumped the lump in the S&S, spread them out and blew on them a bit to get things really hot.  I replaced the grate with the spinning one (from the S&S kit I got) to try the "cold-grate" thing (more on that in a sec).
  • I waited a minute, and rotated the grate, flipped the steaks while moving them back over the coals.  I did that a couple more times, though I was sweating over-doing it so they weren't a full minute.  Then I pulled the steaks and took the pic in my original post.
 

All of that flowed pretty well.  The one rough patch was that the grates want to foul a bit on the bolt heads from the lid-holder on my Performer when inserting/removing grates.  That's a bit annoying/stressful when things are hot and you're got a hot grate, a cold grate, hot coals, a hot chimney/etc.  to deal with.  If there's a hack to minimize the profile of those things I'm interested to hear it.  I assume I'll get the hang of that and it will be a minor detail over time, but it's the one thing I kinda hate about the Weber Kettle right now.

Anyway, I'll probably be doing a salmon before I get back to steaks, but that was a great example of the grill being easy and fast.  That was a concern of mine when I "switched" to charcoal (my 20+ year-old Weber gas grill is still sitting next to the Performer, but has been unused since the arrival of the kettle), but (as y'all know very well) it's just an order-of-operations thing - start the coals before prepping food, etc.
« Last Edit: October 09, 2019, 04:14:48 AM by M635_Guy »

jhagestad

  • WKC Brave
  • Posts: 183
Re: First reverse-sear steaks
« Reply #4 on: October 09, 2019, 11:10:45 AM »
You've got all the details handled well! I agree with you on the Performer bolt heads interfering with the grill grate removal/switch, etc. It's the one reason I've been modifying my old 22" kettle and not simply buying another.

Anyhoo, I'm a guy who loves grilling thick fillets (14-16oz) or ribeyes (16-20oz).  I've done it so much now, that I really don't have to think about it much unless I'm cooking different things in different zones or if the weather is extreme (hot or cold).  With that said, I haven't tried the cold grate sear thing since it sounds like a lot of hassle for a not-so-huge return.  I also don't do reverse sear.  I set up my grill for indirect with 1/2-3/4 chimney of coals on one side.  If my wife wants me to cook chicken kabobs at the same time as a steak, it's the same but I do a full chimney and throw 1/4 of the coals opposite of the searing side.  The steak goes on the hot side first (5-6 minutes a side for a 3" thick fillet; 3 minutes a side for a 2" thick ribeye) - after that's done, I move the steak to the indirect side and go a little longer (8 minutes all on one side for the fillet or 4 minutes all on one side for the ribeye).  When I take it off, I add some garlic butter on top, wrap it loosely in foil and let it rest for about 5 minutes to get everything settled.  Never been disappointed!
Wife: Let me guess... you want to grill again

M635_Guy

  • Smokey Joe
  • Posts: 36
Re: First reverse-sear steaks
« Reply #5 on: October 09, 2019, 04:32:29 PM »
I'll probably get used to the grate, but it's a thing. 

jhagestad

  • WKC Brave
  • Posts: 183
Re: First reverse-sear steaks
« Reply #6 on: October 15, 2019, 06:21:09 AM »
Just tried the reverse sear last night and it wasn't that cumbersome (much to my surprise).  Got to use my thermo-probes for the indirect portion, and it worked out perfect for monday night football. I just need to move them to the sear sooner next time (a little over-cooked for my taste last night). That's the best part about grilling - there's always a next time!
Wife: Let me guess... you want to grill again

Cellar2ful

  • Moderator
  • Posts: 2929
Re: First reverse-sear steaks
« Reply #7 on: October 15, 2019, 06:57:36 AM »


Reverse sear method is the only way I cook tomahawk steaks, rib cap steaks and tri-tips now.  After the internal temp reaches 110 degrees cooked indirect, I pull the meat off the grill and let it rest for 10 minutes, covered with foil.  After 10 minutes, I put the meat back on, spin the grate and sear for 30-45 seconds each side for steaks, 1 minute per side for tri-tips.

http://weberkettleclub.com/forums/index.php?topic=40770.msg405189#msg405189



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