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Author Topic: To paint or not to paint?  (Read 3525 times)

Webster

  • Smokey Joe
  • Posts: 26
To paint or not to paint?
« on: December 18, 2015, 07:25:01 AM »
     I was wondering where people stand with touching up or repainting a kettle? I have a yellow kettle that has some scratches and small cracks on the bowl,the lids fine it has a few dings.The bowl looks like it might have rolled a few times?Now I don't mind the ding marks on the lid or bowl,that gives the old kettles character.I think this kettle would clean up great if I repainted the bowl.
     I can't find any reviews from members who have painted their kettles and reported on the results? Does the paint hold up?I know how rare yellow kettles are,so I don't want to do anything that would make things worse.Help a brutha out.Thanks.

firedude5015

  • WKC Ranger
  • Posts: 1026
Re: To paint or not to paint?
« Reply #1 on: December 18, 2015, 07:38:10 AM »
Personally, I wouldn't paint it. Season the bare spots with oil to prevent rust, and cook away.
My redhead and my "83 blackie have some porcelain damage, i seasoned and use the heck out of them...battle scars and all.
Just my opinion. Others may be different

brewtownbeatdown

  • WKC Performer
  • Posts: 2247
To paint or not to paint?
« Reply #2 on: December 18, 2015, 07:46:30 AM »
As an owner of a yellow, I wouldn't do it. You won't get to experience the fade if you do. After cleaning the bowl, I did touch a couple spots that had been primed/ painted by a prior owner. Only because the primer was embedded in the rough spots & I didn't want to wear a hole in the bowl trying to clean it out. Eventually the spots will fade to a light yellow.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
« Last Edit: December 18, 2015, 07:49:05 AM by brewtownbeatdown »
Obviously looking for a Glen Blue (who isnít?😂).

Looking for anything Happy Cooker, including any re-branded as Montgomery Ward.  Iíve amassed a nice collection, but Iím missing a few still.  Let me know if you can help a fella out🤞

Troy

  • Statesman
  • Posts: 9371
Re: To paint or not to paint?
« Reply #3 on: December 18, 2015, 07:46:53 AM »
Many of us have tried in the past, but nothing holds up and matches perfectly.
Engine enamels will turn black because kettles get hotter than engines apparently.

If you're going to try, look for a caliper paint or flame proof paint - like this one. http://amzn.to/1Ocil2B

I mask everything off and put multiple thin layers on the wounds. I think @Jeff just sprays it on and uses steel wool to clean up after (i could have my people mixed up though)

dazzo

  • WKC Performer
  • Posts: 2311
Re: To paint or not to paint?
« Reply #4 on: December 18, 2015, 07:47:55 AM »
Thinking: "Put it on ebay"

Saying: "Don't paint it. It just doesn't work. Just use it."
Dude, relax your chicken.

MikeRocksTheRed

  • WKC Performer
  • Posts: 3329
    • The Kettle Cookers (facebook group)
Re: To paint or not to paint?
« Reply #5 on: December 18, 2015, 08:16:26 AM »
Many of us have tried in the past, but nothing holds up and matches perfectly.
Engine enamels will turn black because kettles get hotter than engines apparently.

If you're going to try, look for a caliper paint or flame proof paint - like this one. http://amzn.to/1Ocil2B

I mask everything off and put multiple thin layers on the wounds. I think @Jeff just sprays it on and uses steel wool to clean up after (i could have my people mixed up though)

This might do the trick as long as you pay attention to the curing process.  Would probably need an IR thermometor to monitor the temp of the kettle, and need to use coal  baskets so you can remove the coals when the temp hits those curing temps.
62-68 Avocado BAR-B-Q Kettle, Red ER SS Performer, Green DA SS Performer, Black EE three wheeler, 1 SJS, 1 Homer Simpson SJS,  AT Black 26er, 82 Kettle Gasser Deluxe, "A" code 18.5 MBH, M Code Tuck-n-Carry, P Code Go Anywhere, 2015 RANCH FREAKING KETTLE!!!!!!

Jeff

  • WKC Performer
  • Posts: 4783
Re: To paint or not to paint?
« Reply #6 on: December 18, 2015, 08:19:53 AM »
For grills I don't plan on cooking on, I'll try and touch them up if the chip(s) are in high vis areas that bother me.  And yes, its near impossible to find exact paint matches.  For example, there are at least 5-7 variations of shades of red I've seen...then add in if there is a fade to the lid.  It's tough.  With many grills, I'll simple clean the chipped area, sand/dremel off the rust that may have formed.  I've even gone so far as to use Bondo automotive finishing putty to fill in the chipped areas first prior to touching up. Then I'll spray BBQ black high temp paint (without masking), then clean the overspray with 0000 steel wool right to the edge of the chip.  In my opinion, it looks cleaner (and easier to look at) than a big rusty chip. 
To each there own though.  Depends how anal you are.  For me, I'm extremely OCD with the appearance of my grills.









« Last Edit: December 18, 2015, 08:33:33 AM by Jeff »
Kettle collector AND cooker!

Bob BQ

  • WKC Performer
  • Posts: 4447
Re: To paint or not to paint?
« Reply #7 on: December 18, 2015, 09:22:10 AM »
@SixZeroFour clued me in to a pretty good yellow kettle match with this paint. Couldn't find his original yellow RRR post.

Hey Bob - here is the paint I used... It's not perfect but pretty darn close.



Code on the can is CDE1642 - Daytona Yellow
BBQ:it's what's for dinner. Grails ISO: 18Ē Custom. Red SJ. vintage Glen Blue.

Troy

  • Statesman
  • Posts: 9371
Re: To paint or not to paint?
« Reply #8 on: December 18, 2015, 09:34:26 AM »
@SixZeroFour clued me in to a pretty good yellow kettle match with this paint. Couldn't find his original yellow RRR post.

Hey Bob - here is the paint I used... It's not perfect but pretty darn close.



Code on the can is CDE1642 - Daytona Yellow

Good call.
Any issues with burning if you go hotter than 500?
500 isn't very hot

Troy

  • Statesman
  • Posts: 9371
Re: To paint or not to paint?
« Reply #9 on: December 18, 2015, 09:46:03 AM »
Many of us have tried in the past, but nothing holds up and matches perfectly.
Engine enamels will turn black because kettles get hotter than engines apparently.

If you're going to try, look for a caliper paint or flame proof paint - like this one. http://amzn.to/1Ocil2B

I mask everything off and put multiple thin layers on the wounds. I think @Jeff just sprays it on and uses steel wool to clean up after (i could have my people mixed up though)

This might do the trick as long as you pay attention to the curing process.  Would probably need an IR thermometor to monitor the temp of the kettle, and need to use coal  baskets so you can remove the coals when the temp hits those curing temps.

I usually drape some foil over the paint and dump in a chimney of coals... and then let it burn out completely.
the redhead i patched last summer with caliper paint is holding up surprisingly well.

MacEggs

  • WKC Performer
  • Posts: 3416
Re: To paint or not to paint?
« Reply #10 on: December 18, 2015, 12:59:02 PM »
This topic again, eh?? Ö. I recommend to not do it.

I did it to the bowl only of a red 18" that was abused and not respected.
It was initially a looker, and then a cooker.  I cooked on it a lot, and portions of the bowl turned black.

It's your call, as it is your kettle.
There is something fascinating about science.
One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture
out of such a trifling investment of facts.
- Mark Twain

Bob BQ

  • WKC Performer
  • Posts: 4447
Re: To paint or not to paint?
« Reply #11 on: December 18, 2015, 01:12:48 PM »
Good call.
Any issues with burning if you go hotter than 500?
500 isn't very hot

Haven't tried it as of yet...  :o

It'll only be for touch-up and to hold the rust. Not concerned about it fading/burning.
« Last Edit: December 18, 2015, 07:01:43 PM by Bob BQ »
BBQ:it's what's for dinner. Grails ISO: 18Ē Custom. Red SJ. vintage Glen Blue.

GregS

  • WKC Performer
  • Posts: 2143
Re: To paint or not to paint?
« Reply #12 on: December 21, 2015, 08:34:07 AM »
Engine enamels will turn black because kettles get hotter than engines apparently.
POR15 did darken when hot, but it did not turn black.  at ambient temps, it's almost a perfect match.

Ford Corp Blue = old dark blue kettles
Ford Engine Red = very close to the old 70's reds.