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Author Topic: Basic rotisserie vs not-rotisserie question re: TURKEY  (Read 1247 times)

addicted-to-smoke

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Basic rotisserie vs not-rotisserie question re: TURKEY
« on: November 08, 2017, 06:35:14 AM »
My question here is mostly about flavor, not juiciness or crisp skin or whatever.

I'm committed to braving my first rotisserie turkey this year, actually the first turkey I'll have ever done.

I know what the rotisserie method gains, but I want to know what I'm giving up by not stuffing the bird with a crapload of seasonings and veggies or whatever, like so many oven roaster recipes always have. I'm not referring to any sauces or veggies that might ride along in a roasting pan, but what gets inserted into the bird.

I'm assuming that if I tried that on the spit, everything would eventually flop out?

Joetee

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Re: Basic rotisserie vs not-rotisserie question re: TURKEY
« Reply #1 on: November 08, 2017, 06:43:27 AM »
I'm doing my turkey this yr also on the Rotisserie. I've seen one put a pan under the bird with veggies and water and the giblets to make a nice gravy with.

Try this. Just adapt to Rotisserie.
http://amazingribs.com/recipes/chicken_turkey_duck/ultimate_smoked_turkey.html

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« Last Edit: November 08, 2017, 06:55:25 AM by Joetee »

HoosierKettle

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Re: Basic rotisserie vs not-rotisserie question re: TURKEY
« Reply #2 on: November 08, 2017, 06:59:36 AM »
I always do a practice turkey when trying a new method a week or 2 before a main event. That way I know. I was very happy with my last roti turkey. I stuffed with onion and some other things that did partially tumble out. This year I will experiment with closing the opening enough to retain what I put in. I will do this in the practice turkey first.


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JEBIV

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Re: Basic rotisserie vs not-rotisserie question re: TURKEY
« Reply #3 on: November 08, 2017, 07:20:41 AM »
Not that I have tried it but it seems like you should still be able to stuff a roti turkey

Cellar2ful

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Re: Basic rotisserie vs not-rotisserie question re: TURKEY
« Reply #4 on: November 08, 2017, 07:38:58 AM »
I put a new drip pan with 1 cup of hot water in it between the charcoal baskets to catch drippings from the turkey.  My wife makes the turkey stuffing and cooks it in a large pan or bowl in the oven.  Once I run the drippings though a fat separator, the drippings are poured over the turkey stuffing to add flavor and moisten it. 




The only thing I stuff in the cavity are several sprigs of rosemary.  Stuffing the cavity will lengthen your cooking times. I do put some of my dry rub seasonings both inside the cavity and under the skin of the turkey. To estimate your cooking time figure 11 minutes per pound, unstuffed.  Check with an instant read thermometer.  Don't rely on pop up thermometers that a lot of turkeys are now coming with.  If it pops up while still cooking, the breast will be overcooked.

Here is a really good article with tips and cooking temps on turkeys from Thermapen.  Some of the info will not apply as it is for cooking in an oven but the finished cooking temps are the same.

http://blog.thermoworks.com/2010/11/turkey-temps/

It also helps to arrange your charcoal baskets to one end of the kettle. Place the turkey on the spit so the legs and thighs (dark meat) are closer to the charcoal baskets.  This moves the breast meat further from the heat.  The breast meat requires a lower temperature to be cooked (165 degrees) whereas the dark meat requires a higher temp (175-185 degrees).



 

« Last Edit: November 08, 2017, 07:47:58 AM by Cellar2ful »
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Foster Dahlet

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Re: Basic rotisserie vs not-rotisserie question re: TURKEY
« Reply #5 on: November 08, 2017, 07:47:43 AM »
My question here is mostly about flavor, not juiciness or crisp skin or whatever.

I'm committed to braving my first rotisserie turkey this year, actually the first turkey I'll have ever done.

I know what the rotisserie method gains, but I want to know what I'm giving up by not stuffing the bird with a crapload of seasonings and veggies or whatever, like so many oven roaster recipes always have. I'm not referring to any sauces or veggies that might ride along in a roasting pan, but what gets inserted into the bird.

I'm assuming that if I tried that on the spit, everything would eventually flop out?

We roti the bird every Thanksgiving.  You are not sacrificing flavor by eliminating the stuffing.  We put the stuffing in the oven while the bird cooks on the grill.  Win/win.
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Mike in Roseville

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Basic rotisserie vs not-rotisserie question re: TURKEY
« Reply #6 on: November 08, 2017, 08:08:16 AM »
So what are you giving up not stuffing the bird?

Extended cooking times, the risk of "under cooked" stuffing -->food poisoning, and the potential for "overcooked" turkey.

Very few people I know still actually stuff the bird for the latter two reasons. My mother-in-law is one who still does. Her turkey is always....ALWAYS dry. In fact, my wife always thought turkey was "shredded" and unable to slice until she came to our family's Thanksgiving. Seriously. My mother-in-law still always insists on making the turkey.

Ok....now to the bird portion of your dilemma.

I would suggest brining the bird (or even buying a pre-brined bird). Turkey's are so cheap this time of year you could get a couple and practice. You will solve the moisture/salt issue.

Season the bird all over. Under the skin and in the cavity. If you place the bird on a grate (as opposed to a roti) cut up an apple and or/ an onion and put it in there. Some people like to use butter....I like duck fat because of the flavor (and its dairy free).

One suggestion I would make is use little or no smoke wood. Smoke wood, if mild wood like apple or cherry, can complement the meat (1-2 chunks max). I did one years ago after Thanksgiving with a free turkey I received and used some hickory. It was ok, but the smoke was too much for the meat. The resulting soup even had a smokey flavor that was...noticeable.

@Cellar2ful....I really like that basket placement tip!
« Last Edit: November 08, 2017, 10:13:42 AM by Mike in Roseville »
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Cellar2ful

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Re: Basic rotisserie vs not-rotisserie question re: TURKEY
« Reply #7 on: November 08, 2017, 08:22:47 AM »

Good point regarding wood smoke effects on turkeys @Mike in Roseville . I have fine tuned it so that I use about 1/2 to 3/4 cup of apple wood chips on the coals when I first put the bird on.  I soak them in water for 1/2 hour before use.  My experience has been using more than that adds no more smoke flavor but turns the skin way to dark for my liking. 

One of our favorite after Thanksgiving rituals is making the turkey carcass soup.  It has a unique mild smokey flavor when using a carcass that has been cooked on a Weber. 
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addicted-to-smoke

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Re: Basic rotisserie vs not-rotisserie question re: TURKEY
« Reply #8 on: November 08, 2017, 09:30:15 AM »
You guys have really come through. I've seen pieces parts of that info in previous threads here, so thanks again! I think I'll be OK ... if I freeze any turkey I cook beforehand, instead of foisting it upon the family now and later.

iCARRY

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Re: Basic rotisserie vs not-rotisserie question re: TURKEY
« Reply #9 on: November 08, 2017, 04:41:05 PM »
You will not sacrifice any flavor at all. Put the stuffing in the oven. Use a piece or 2 of cherry, apple, or pecan. Or a mix of them.
This year I am not going to spin my turkey. Going to try spatchcocking a 20lb Turkey, firing up the WSM, remove water pan and cook direct over the coals. Let the drippings cause the smoke.


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Travis

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Re: Basic rotisserie vs not-rotisserie question re: TURKEY
« Reply #10 on: November 08, 2017, 05:22:34 PM »
I like that idea @iCARRY
Getting time to bundle up and keep those kettles warm. Place coffee cup on the lid and itíll keep it nice and hot.
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Joetee

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Re: Basic rotisserie vs not-rotisserie question re: TURKEY
« Reply #11 on: November 09, 2017, 05:23:36 AM »
You will not sacrifice any flavor at all. Put the stuffing in the oven. Use a piece or 2 of cherry, apple, or pecan. Or a mix of them.
This year I am not going to spin my turkey. Going to try spatchcocking a 20lb Turkey, firing up the WSM, remove water pan and cook direct over the coals. Let the drippings cause the smoke.


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Spatchcock comes out nice. Even on the oven.

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iCARRY

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Re: Basic rotisserie vs not-rotisserie question re: TURKEY
« Reply #12 on: November 09, 2017, 05:25:25 AM »
Oh yeah, I have done it numerous times. Just want to try it a little different with cooking direct over the coals.


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Joetee

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Re: Basic rotisserie vs not-rotisserie question re: TURKEY
« Reply #13 on: November 09, 2017, 05:27:53 AM »
Oh yeah, I have done it numerous times. Just want to try it a little different with cooking direct over the coals.


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Nice time to have a stacker to raise it up little.

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Mike in Roseville

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Re: Basic rotisserie vs not-rotisserie question re: TURKEY
« Reply #14 on: November 09, 2017, 07:08:19 AM »
@Joetee...

CB stacker kits should be on sale ;)


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